Researchers

Peggy Estrada
  • Title
    • Associate Research Scientist
  • Division Social Sciences Division
  • Department
    • Latin American & Latino Studies
  • Phone
    831-459-3449 (Office)
  • Email
  • Fax
    831-459-3125
  • Website
  • Office Location
    • Merrill College Academic Building, 15#
  • Office Hours By appointment
  • Mail Stop Merrill/Crown Faculty Services
  • Mailing Address
    • 1156 High St. LALS Merrill Faculty Services
    • Santa Cruz CA 95064

Summary of Expertise

K-12 education: pedagogy; classroom organization; sociocultural theory; linguistic, instructional, and curricular policies and practices and their consequences for core curricular access and achievement; Latino, English learner, and poor urban students; integration of theory, research, and practice. Mixed methods, quantitative and qualitative analyses.

Research Interests

English learner student linguistic, instructional, and curricular policies and practices and their consequences for core curricular access, achievement, and integration with non-English learner peers; pedagogy, instructional quality, and achievement in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms with a special focus on Latino student educational policy and practices; teacher-student and peer relationships and their relation to achievement and social development; the integration of theory, research, and practice in the reform of teaching and learning.

Estrada recently completed a large-scale, longitudinal, mixed-methods research project focusing on English learner linguistic, instructional, and curricular policies and practices and their consequences for reclassification to fluent English proficient, core curricular access, achievement, and integration with non-English learner peers (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences Grant No. R305A110512.)

Her current mixed-methods research project, English Learner Achievement in Elementary School: Classroom Composition and Opportunity to Learn (Spencer Foundation, Lyle Spencer Research Award 201700044) involves a small-scale experiment, classroom observations of elementary school English language arts instruction and surveys and interviews of teachers, principals, and instructional support staff. It focuses on three questions: First, do English language arts classroom practices differ depending on classroom composition (separate 100% EL classrooms versus mixed EL and non-EL classrooms) and if so, how? Second, do classroom practices and classroom composition each predict student achievement? And finally, is any observed relation between classroom composition and student achievement accounted for by differences in classroom practices? http://news.ucsc.edu/2016/12/english-proficiency.html

 

Biography, Education and Training

Peggy Estrada’s work focuses on promoting positive academic achievement and social-emotional development among culturally and linguistically diverse children and adolescents, with a special focus on English learner and Latino students. In partnership with districts, she answers field-, policy-, and practice-relevant questions using a sociocultural lens and mixed methods. A native of California and second-generation American, Estrada is currently Associate Research Scientist in the Latin American and Latino Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Formerly she was Associate Research Scientist at the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence at UCSC.

 

Estrada received her B.A. in child development and her elementary teaching credential from California State University, Chico and her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, with a major in child and adolescent development and a minor in psychology. She began her career in education as a preschool teacher and was also a public school teacher for Migrant Education in rural northern California. 

 

In 2000, she co-authored (with Roland Tharp, Stephanie Dalton, and Lois Yamauchi) Teaching Transformed, which integrates sociocultural theory, research, and practical pedagogical and classroom organizational guidelines for designing instruction that can achieve excellence, fairness, inclusion, and harmony. In 2004 she produced “Engaging Students in Reading Comprehension Using Instructional Conversation,” a documentary-style video, which illustrates key pedagogical principles. In this video, a two-way Spanish-English immersion teacher models instructional conversation and sustained teacher-student dialog that enhances student comprehension of text, while instructing a small group of first-grade students in reading. Research stemming from this and other work has appeared in academic journals and as book chapters.

 

Four middle-school case studies of English learner educational programs led to development of the concept of Curricular Streams (placement structures that determine access to English language development courses, core content, the full curriculum, and non-English learner students) and hypotheses consequently tested in large-scale mixed-methods research. Estrada’s current work and publications focus on English learner students.

 

Honors, Awards and Grants

English Learner Achievement in Elementary School: Classroom Composition and Opportunity to Learn, Spencer Foundation, Lyle Spencer Research Award 201700044. http://www.spencer.org/english-learner-achievement-elementary-school-classroom-composition-and-opportunity-learn

Reclassifying and Not Reclassifying English Learners as Fluent English Proficient: Access and Achievement. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences Grant No. R305A110512.

Excellence, Inclusion, Fairness, and Harmony: Patterns of Instructional Activity in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms. Office of Educational Research and Improvement.

The Role of Classroom Social Organization in Educational Functioning and the Development of Peer Relationships and Teacher-Student Relationships. Office of Educational Research and Improvement Grant No. R306A6001..

Selected Publications

Teaching Interests

No courses taught.